Start Advanced research dating behavior

Advanced research dating behavior

Understanding the role social and digital media play in these romantic relationships is critical, given how deeply enmeshed these technology tools are in lives of American youth and how rapidly these platforms and devices change.

One-quarter (24%) of teen “daters” or roughly 8% of all teens have dated or hooked up with someone they first met online.

Of those who have met a partner online, the majority met on social media sites, and the bulk of them met on Facebook.

In decisions ranging from financial risk to diamond rings to potential dating partners, the emotional response served as a “trade-able quantity,” and when combined with cognitive trade-offs, produced a more valid model of human decision making.

In applied studies, biometrics are used to quantify degrees of emotional arousal to advertising, packaging, and new product concept testing.

As I detailed in an earlier post, the most common lies told by online daters concern age and physical appearance. There is, surprisingly, still some stigma attached to online dating, despite its general popularity.

Gross misrepresentations about education or relationship status are rare, in part because people realize that once they meet someone in person and begin to develop a relationship, serious lies are highly likely to be revealed. Many people continue to see it as a last refuge for desperate people who can’t get a date “in real life." Many couples that meet online are aware of this stigma and, if they enter into a serious relationship, may create false cover stories about how they met. A common belief is that love found online can't last.

We also find that both males and females are more likely to reply to users whose attributes come closest to the stated preferences of the receivers, and there is significant discrepancy between a user's stated dating preference and his/her actual online dating behavior.