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Aish dating wisdom

Also we place salt on the bread because salt is a preserver, symbolizing that this meal is no longer merely a transitory experience, but a moment that will last for eternity.

If Jewish "choseness" is in fact the cause of anti-Semitism, then hatred against the Jews should disappear when Jews drop the claim that they are chosen. The Jews in Germany and Austria experienced the most vicious outpouring of anti-Semitic hatred in history.

The Torah (Leviticus ) speaks of a "Covenant of Salt," where God instructs us to use salt on all the offerings as if to say that His covenant with us is eternal, sealed with salt.

Since salt never spoils, it is a symbol of indestructibility.

Even so, salt should always be on a Jewish table, and there is a Kabbalistic custom to dip the bread in salt 3 times at the start of every meal.

(Many are particular to do this on Shabbat.) The reason for this custom is because the table that we eat on is compared to the Altar that once stood in the Holy Temple. Just as all offerings on the Altar were salted, the bread that we eat is salted, too.

Late in the 19th century, the Jews living in Germany and Austria collectively rejected their "choseness" and were assimilated by their host nation. Gentile society was their social environment of choice, and Germany their beloved motherland. Precisely when Jews rejected their claim to "chosenness," they suffered the most virulent forms of anti-Semitism.

In fact, they believed that the non-Jews among whom they lived were the true chosen people. Another test of the Chosen People theory is to see how humanity responds to other peoples who claim to be "chosen." If the claim that Jews are chosen gives rise to anti-Semitism, then all groups who make similar claims of having been "chosen" should also become targets of persecution and hatred.

(sources: Talmud Brachot 55a; Leviticus with Rabbi S. Hirsch; Mishnah Berurah 1) In 2001, an Arab terrorist detonated a guitar case filled with explosives in Sbarro's pizzeria at the corner of King George Street and Jaffa Road, the busiest area of downtown Jerusalem.