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Carbindating

Carbon dating has a certain margin of error, usually depending on the age and material of the sample used.

Carbon-14 is used to date dead plants and animals, because plants and animals incorporate C-14 into their bodies by eating, drinking, and breathing in an environment containing C-14.

Emilio Segrè asserted in his autobiography that Enrico Fermi suggested the concept to Libby in a seminar at Chicago that year.

Libby estimated that the steady state radioactivity concentration of exchangeable carbon-14 would be about 14 disintegrations per minute (dpm) per gram.

After plants die or they are consumed by other organisms (for example, by humans or other animals) the C allows the age of the sample to be estimated.

The technique of radiocarbon dating was developed by Willard Libby and his colleagues at the University of Chicago in 1949.

Through the life of the organism, the proportion of C-14 to C-12 reaches the same proportion as in the rest of the environment.

When the organism dies, however, it ceases to incorporate carbon into its body.

The level of atmospheric Radiometric dating in general, of course, poses a huge problem for people who believe that the universe is 6000-odd years old.