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Carriers cannot intercept i Messages because they’re encrypted and routed over Apple servers—and the same thing applies to Facetime.

to Apple, it may be possible to pressure the company, in secret, to make services like i Message and Facetime wiretap compliant.

In the past fortnight, leaked documents have shed light on secret National Security Agency surveillance programs involving the collection of phone records and eavesdropping on Internet communications.

Apple was one of several major companies linked to an Internet spying system called PRISM, which is reportedly used by the NSA as a sort of portal through which it obtains emails, photos, videos, chats, and other data under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

But now Apple has launched a privacy offensive, affirming that is committed to protecting users’ data and denying that it provided the government with any “direct access” to sift through private information stored on its servers.

Of particular note, the company said in a statement Monday that its chat services i Message and Face Time “are protected by end-to-end encryption so no one but the sender and receiver can see or read them,” adding that “Apple cannot decrypt that data.” This implies that communications sent over these services cannot be snooped on by the government, but the reality is a little more complex and unclear.

And if you're plugged into the digital space like myself, you're probably around a smartphone or webcam every day.

Plastic surgery is obviously the most extreme response to fixing the "flaws." And I'm just not there.

Face Time Audio is available on any i OS device that supports i OS 7 or newer, and any Macintosh with a forward-facing camera running 10.9.2 and later.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced Face Time on June 7, 2010, in conjunction with the i Phone 4, in a keynote speech at the 2010 Apple Worldwide Developers Conference.

Indeed, that appears to be exactly what happened with Skype, which claimed to be encrypted peer-to-peer, yet at the same time apparently provided the NSA with access to communications.