Start Rabbi yaacov deyo speed dating

Rabbi yaacov deyo speed dating

That''s the idea behind speed dating, a new trend in matchmaking that''s like thrift shopping for love.

Speed-dating has its supporters and its detractors, for obvious reasons, but it has become a mainstay of contemporary urban dating rituals.

The reason – it provides a face-to-face opportunity for busy singles to meet others looking for romance in a controlled, time-limited manner, allowing daters to meet many more prospects than they would through old-fashioned or virtual means.

The concept of “Speed Dating” was actually trademarked by Rabbi Yaacov Deyo of Aish Ha Torah.

In 1998, at Peet’s Cafe in Beverly Hills, the first recorded speed-dating event was held.

In the last few decades, this fun, dynamic way to meet a potential partner became so successful it started spreading all over the world.

Barcelona is one of the many cities that adopted this style of dating.

I have a name tag the size of Europe tacked to my shirt and a sad glass of museum red clamped in my hand.

Speed-dating has been going since 1998 – when American rabbi Yaacov Deyo invented the practice to encourage Jewish singles in LA to meet – but you might have expected it to have evolved beyond the ice-breaker-claxon-move-on format in the past decade-and-a-half. Though it is not as pervasive as its online cousin, speed-dating has adopted quite the adventurous bent – there's been love on a roller coaster (and not just the metaphorical, Ronan Keating kind), courting on ice, serenading at the foosball table, swing-dance soliciting and silent flirting at libraries (the eyes have it, natch).

It was also a chance to strut my recently thinner body and my cute high-heeled shoes.

As I sauntered into the Lala Lounge, I was pleased to see a well-rounded crowd sipping their drinks.

At this year's Frieze, there was even fake dating: British artist Ed Fornieles set up Characterdate, which encouraged people to adopt a fake identity, transforming both them and their dating experiences into a narrative in the process. It can't be worse than date number two back at the museum, as Banker John opens with the line, "If you could be successful at anything in life, what would it be?