Start Radiochemical dating for chemistry

Radiochemical dating for chemistry

By measuring the amount of and the amount of stable isotope present and determining the ratio of these amounts, both the quantity and mass of the element can be ascertained.

Libby cleverly realized that carbon-14 in the atmosphere would find its way into living matter, which would thus be tagged with the radioactive isotope.

Theoretically, if one could detect the amount of carbon-14 in an object, one could establish that object’s age using the half-life, or rate of decay, of the isotope.

In 1946, Willard Libby proposed an innovative method for dating organic materials by measuring their content of carbon-14, a newly discovered radioactive isotope of carbon.

Known as radiocarbon dating, this method provides objective age estimates for carbon-based objects that originated from living organisms.

Download a free sample chapter, including the full table of contents, to see how this important work will improve your understanding of this crucial science.

The Encyclopedia is available in a four volume printed edition or on CD-ROM containing PDF versions of all four volumes.

All radioactive decays follow first order kinetics.