Start Science of dating book

Science of dating book

On OKTrends, Rudder made ample use of his Harvard math degree, pumping out pie charts and line graphs to bolster observations like, "heavy Twitter users masturbate more often" than light Twitter users and "black people are more than twice as likely to mention their faith in their profiles" as people who identify as white, asian, or hispanic.

Four years later, OKTrends is back in book form with Rudder’s The original OKTrends blog was fascinating, less so for its observations about which profile photos were more likely to attract messages — which it did meticulously — than for its comments on larger issues of self-identification. "Looking at people like this is like looking at the Earth from space," he writes. This is, Rudder writes, "a series of vignettes"; you’ll find very little analysis in .

In one widely-shared post, Rudder created word clouds based on how users describe themselves, indexed by race and gender. "You lose the detail, but you get to see something familiar in a totally new way." Armed with that sense of wonder and a sharp enthusiasm for the data he’s collected, Rudder tackles a range of subjects in three sections, each containing dozens of lovely two-toned graphs: What Brings Us Together (dating and sexual attraction), What Pulls Us Apart (social and political fractures), and What Makes Us Who We Are (how we self-identify). Rudder’s writing skirts politically charged topics, oftentimes connecting the data to his own personal experiences or paving the way for a block quote cribbed from a liberal arts syllabus.

Rudder has found that white men on dating sites are far less likely to send messages to black women than any other race. Occasionally, Rudder does make reference to what amounts to this extra-civilian status, offhandedly commenting on secretive decisions social media companies make to perpetuate loops of endless likes and faves.

Rudder might have written a more useful book about that design process, knowledgeable as he is of the inner workings of the industry.

The result is unlike any social science or humor book we’ve seen before.

by Bethenny Frankel Bethenny Frankel, four-time New York Times bestselling author, self-made businesswoman, and media maven, offers her hard-won guidance on dating and relationships in the tradition of her breakout book, A Place of Yes.

Open to daters of all persuasions—single, partnered, straight, LGBTQ, polyamorous, and everything in between— over 500 people so far have joined us for a titillating evening exploring how our senses drive love and lust.

Our unique experience has featured evolutionary psychologists, neuroscientists, biologists, comedians, historians, food designers and drag performers.

calculates the relationship between "percentiles of attractiveness" and how many friends a Facebook user has. Rudder has also compiled maps showing where Craigslist missed connections are most likely to occur, state-by-state. We’re divided by class, which correlates with geography. He cites Naomi Klein’s Rudder is excited by the idea of being able to see, as the book’s cover says, how we behave "when we think no one is watching" — a world where data collection doesn’t occur in a lab, but in the channels of the internet where participants are free from self-consciousness. The subtext, though he never quite goes out and says it, is an idea that’s held by many in the tech industry: we’re living through the democratization of information, in this case of hard data.

It tells us that Twitter users with more than 1,000 followers use a lot of corny marketing words like "marketing" and "tweetup." We learn that when you compare the words most commonly used on Twitter with those used in the English language elsewhere, Twitter users write "love" and "today" with far more frequency. In New York it’s the subway; in Texas it’s Walmart; in Southern California, the gym. But buried in the back of the book, in Rudder’s notes about the data-collection itself, we learn that the author gathered most of his information through a combination of buddy-to-buddy and business-to-business interactions with the people behind the companies who collect it, an admission that doesn’t do much to dissolve the vision of Silicon Valley as an exclusive foosball-peppered frat lounge.

This one-of-a-kind event explores the science of attraction through a range of enticing sensory adventures.