Start Teen dating violence in europe

Teen dating violence in europe

"When we educate ourselves, we begin to consider those admittedly frightening possibilities that ultimately increase our kids' safety." A recent study, published in the journal Pediatrics, reports that educating teens through school-based intervention proved to be an effective way to decrease and stop teen dating abuse.

Like intimate partner violence among adults, TDV occurs without respect to age, race, religion, socioeconomic status and sexual orientation.

Most of the teens surveyed reported experiencing such violence more than one time.

The findings also showed that those who experienced some form of dating violence also had a higher prevalence of other health risks like drinking alcohol, using drugs or thinking about suicide.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study reveal that nearly 21% of female teens who date have experienced some form of violence at the hands of their partner in the last year—and almost half of male students report the same.

The results, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, showed that about 7% of teen girls reported experiencing physical violence, 8% said they experienced sexual violence and 6% experienced both.

Though girls were more likely to experience violence, the numbers show dating assaults affect young boys as well.

The new CDC survey adds to its prior research into the prevalence of dating violence, but the latest version asked updated questions that include sexual violence and more accurately portray violent behaviors, the study authors say.

Future research should look at the frequency of violence in teen dating relationships and how that may harm teens' health, the researchers conclude.